New paper: conservation is about making a difference, but typical planning based on representation can make little difference compared to actively planning to avoid loss

A new paper, led by Lara Monteiro, a member of Rafael Loyola's research group at Universidade Federal de Goiás (UFG), has made advances in planning for landscape and climate dynamics. The paper,  co-authored with colleagues at UFG and the Conservation Planning Group's Bob Pressey, is now published online in Biodiversity and Conservation. The paper contrasted alternative planning strategies … Continue reading New paper: conservation is about making a difference, but typical planning based on representation can make little difference compared to actively planning to avoid loss

New paper: a systematic review of the socioeconomic factors that influence how marine protected areas impact on ecosystems and livelihoods

Marine protected areas (MPAs) are not always placed where they can maximise positive impacts on conservation and livelihoods. Whilst clear MPA guidelines are available that focus on biophysical criteria, less attention has been given to incorporating socioeconomic dimensions into the MPA planning process. A new paper, led by Me’ira Mizrahi and published in Society and … Continue reading New paper: a systematic review of the socioeconomic factors that influence how marine protected areas impact on ecosystems and livelihoods

Two comments in Science questioning the value of large marine parks

Members of the Conservation Planning Group were authors on two letters published today in the journal Science. Jessica Cramp comments on the effectiveness of a large shark reserve in Micronesia. The establishment of the reserve was received with fanfare from the conservation community and, if left in place as initially intended, would have increased protection for … Continue reading Two comments in Science questioning the value of large marine parks

Inadequate protection of the Great Barrier Reef, and where to from here?

The Great Barrier Reef, in northern Queensland, is a national and international icon, its significance recognised by World Heritage listing. The Reef has its own dedicated agency to oversee management and avoid adverse impacts from development. The sources of these impacts are diverse, ranging from coastal development and shipping, fishing, catchment land uses, and global warming. The … Continue reading Inadequate protection of the Great Barrier Reef, and where to from here?

Assessing bycatch threats to mobile marine species and evaluating the effectiveness of marine protected areas

Fisheries bycatch can result in significant biomass removal of protected and vulnerable species, leading to population decline and increased extinction risk. A principal role of marine protected areas (MPAs) is to prevent biodiversity loss, so it is important to test the ability of MPAs to mitigate bycatch. In a new paper authored by Heather Welch … Continue reading Assessing bycatch threats to mobile marine species and evaluating the effectiveness of marine protected areas

Cumulative human impacts on Brazilian coral reefs

Rafael Magris is lead author on a new study just out in the journal Diversity reporting on a risk assessment of the coral reefs in Brazil. The study mapped out the geographic patterns of exposure of reefs to a range of stressors: fishing, land-based pollution, mining, shipping movements, coastal development, aquaculture, and global warming. By accounting … Continue reading Cumulative human impacts on Brazilian coral reefs

Governance failure limits water quality improvement for the Great Barrier Reef

Management of the Great Barrier Reef's catchments is vital to improving water quality of the Reef. Investments in management of these cathments in recent decades total hundreds of millions of dollars, but measurable improvements have been slight. One reason is that the complex governance of the Reef and its catchments has failed in a number of ways. … Continue reading Governance failure limits water quality improvement for the Great Barrier Reef

New paper: Biologically representative and well connected marine reserves enhance biodiversity persistence in conservation planning

Rafael Magris is lead author on a new paper published in Conservation Letters. The paper offers new insights into the design of marine protected areas. Currently much of the conservation planning literature uses one set of goals: either connectivity, demographic persistence, or representation of species. An analysis combining all three approaches was long overdue, so … Continue reading New paper: Biologically representative and well connected marine reserves enhance biodiversity persistence in conservation planning

New paper: Generic formulae for comprehensive estimation of costs to control invasive species, with application to north-western Australia

Our five-year project on decision support for island management, in collaboration with managers in the Pilbara region, is now producing published papers. One of these, led by Amelia Wenger, is now available online. We consulted with managers and suppliers of material and services to estimate, across several hundred islands, costs related to labour, transport, consumables, … Continue reading New paper: Generic formulae for comprehensive estimation of costs to control invasive species, with application to north-western Australia