New paper: A global comparative analysis of impact evaluation methods in estimating the effectiveness of protected areas

In a new paper from PhD research by Luiz Ribas, we tried to answer the question: how do different methods of impact evaluation estimate the effectiveness of protected areas in avoiding deforestation? This study is a systematic review that searched for quantitative measurements of protected areas’ (PAs') effectiveness around the world. Until recently in ecology … Continue reading New paper: A global comparative analysis of impact evaluation methods in estimating the effectiveness of protected areas

New paper: A spatial approach to identifying small-scale fishers’ vulnerability to restrictions from marine protected areas

Marine protected areas (MPAs) have the potential to support small-scale fishers in managing their resources. However, when the varying levels of fishers' vulnerability to restrictions are not considered, MPAs can, often unintentionally, result in adverse impacts on livelihoods. In a recent paper from Meira’s PhD research in Myanmar, we took a spatial approach to identifying … Continue reading New paper: A spatial approach to identifying small-scale fishers’ vulnerability to restrictions from marine protected areas

New paper: How much do we know about the conservation impacts of marine protected areas in the South Pacific?

Marine protected areas (MPAs) in the South Pacific have a long history. In a recent article led by Patrick Smallhorn-West and published in Biodiversity and Conservation, we reviewed what is currently known about the impacts of MPAs in this region. Impact evaluation involves quantifying the effects of an intervention over and above the counterfactual of no … Continue reading New paper: How much do we know about the conservation impacts of marine protected areas in the South Pacific?

New paper: Incentivizing co-management for conservation impact

The expansion of coastal marine protected areas can suffer from two key drawbacks: (a) the difficulty of incentivizing local communities to manage areas for conservation when their livelihoods also depend on resource use; and (b) the frequent placement of protected areas where extractive uses pose little threat or in locations with limited value for either … Continue reading New paper: Incentivizing co-management for conservation impact

New paper: Predicting and managing island invasions

Ecosystem invasion by non-native species represents one of the biggest threats to biodiversity. Non-native species management on offshore islands is especially challenging and resource demanding for conservation. Non-native plants increase the extinction risk of native plants and animal populations. Identifying ways of improving the cost-effectiveness of managing them is therefore critical for positive conservation outcomes. … Continue reading New paper: Predicting and managing island invasions

New paper: Scalar capital as ingredient of success in conservation governance: evidence from Melanesia

Problems of scale abound in the governance of complex social-ecological systems. The governance of these systems typically occurs at a single scale (e.g. local, national), but needs to inform governance and actions at other scales to be truly effective at achieving social and ecological outcomes across multiple scales. This process of integrating conservation planning across … Continue reading New paper: Scalar capital as ingredient of success in conservation governance: evidence from Melanesia

Implementing a social-ecological systems framework for conservation monitoring: lessons from a multi-country coral reef program

Recently Georgina's work on integrated social-ecological systems monitoring and evaluation for coral reef management with the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) was published in Biological Conservation. Featured previously in the Conservation Planning Blog, the work has been ongoing since 2016. To learn more, see the following media release from WCS (the original version can be found … Continue reading Implementing a social-ecological systems framework for conservation monitoring: lessons from a multi-country coral reef program

New paper: Identifying the strengths and weaknesses of conservation planning at different scales – the Coral Triangle as a case study

Approaches to effectively integrate conservation planning across different levels (e.g. local, national, global) remain elusive, despite the increasing awareness of its importance. To plan across multiple levels most effectively, the relative strengths and weaknesses of planning at different levels must be understood. In a new paper led by Jess Cheok, published in Ecology and Society, … Continue reading New paper: Identifying the strengths and weaknesses of conservation planning at different scales – the Coral Triangle as a case study

New paper: Marine zoning revisited: how zoning the Great Barrier Reef has evolved as an effective spatial planning approach for marine ecosystem‐based management

For nearly 40 years, marine zoning has played an important role in managing the Great Barrier Reef.  Zoning today, however, has changed considerably since the first zoning plans were finalized in 1988. A recent study, led by Jon Day and published in the journal Aquatic Conservation, summarises numerous lessons learned from decades of applying zoning … Continue reading New paper: Marine zoning revisited: how zoning the Great Barrier Reef has evolved as an effective spatial planning approach for marine ecosystem‐based management