New Paper: The importance of fishing grounds as perceived by local communities can be undervalued by measures of socioeconomic cost used in conservation planning

Marine reserve placement must account for the importance of places for resource use to minimize negative socioeconomic impacts and improve compliance. It is often assumed that placing marine reserves in locations that minimize lost fishing opportunities will reduce impacts on coastal communities, but the influence of the fishing data used on this outcome remains poorly … Continue reading New Paper: The importance of fishing grounds as perceived by local communities can be undervalued by measures of socioeconomic cost used in conservation planning

The Conservation Planning Group at ESA 2016

The Ecology Society of Australia 2016 conference is happening now in Fremantle, Western Australia. A few of the Conservation Planning Group are in attendance, so come learn about what we're working on, and say hi! Tuesday 29th Nov, 15:00, Rottnest Room Rebecca Weeks - Expansion of marine reserve networks via social diffusion benefits ecological connectivity … Continue reading The Conservation Planning Group at ESA 2016

New Paper: Sympathy for the devil: Detailing the effects of planning-unit size, thematic resolution of reef classes, and socioeconomic costs on spatial priorities for marine conservation

Jessica and colleagues from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, and the French Research Institute for Development recently published a paper in PLoS ONE. The study looked at different factors related to data resolution and spatial heterogeneity involved in the process of prioritising areas for marine conservation, and how … Continue reading New Paper: Sympathy for the devil: Detailing the effects of planning-unit size, thematic resolution of reef classes, and socioeconomic costs on spatial priorities for marine conservation

Conversation Piece – The Coral Sea: an ocean jewel that needs more protection

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Bob Pressey, James Cook University; Alana Grech, Macquarie University, and Trevor J Ward, University of Technology Sydney The federal government is considering changes to Australia’s marine reserves to implement a national system. This week The Conversation is looking at the science behind marine … Continue reading Conversation Piece – The Coral Sea: an ocean jewel that needs more protection

Queensland’s native vegetation remains threatened with decline following vote in Parliament

Queensland’s Vegetation Management Act, 1999 was constituted to address growing concerns over the effects of broad-scale clearing of native vegetation, but also to encourage the ecologically sustainable use of land and maintain regional biodiversity. The Act largely dictates the aegis under which land clearing can occur by regulating clearing of vegetation communities (mapped as “regional … Continue reading Queensland’s native vegetation remains threatened with decline following vote in Parliament

Governance across the land-sea interface: Challenges & opportunities

In the context of increasing pressures on the land-sea interface, the role of governance is a potentially important, yet unfortunately an understudied consideration in our pursuit of sustainability. Existing governance can set the course for the fragmented decision-making that currently spawns many inappropriate uses of coastal areas and watersheds (e.g., land-clearing for agriculture without considering … Continue reading Governance across the land-sea interface: Challenges & opportunities

Does systematic conservation planning make any difference?

The world is filling up with conservation plans. Many hundreds have been completed worldwide. But how many make a difference, in terms of preventing the loss of biodiversity? And what can we learn about these planning exercises to plan with greater conservation impact in the future? Emma McIntosh, undertaking a PhD at Oxford University, is … Continue reading Does systematic conservation planning make any difference?

Designing marine reserve networks with stakeholders

Integrating stakeholder preferences into science-driven approaches to designing marine reserve networks can help to create designs that are scientifically sound, while taking into account local knowledge and preferences. Early engagement and input from stakeholders can facilitate the successful implementation of new marine reserves and maximise compliance. Worldwide, overfishing and climate change threaten marine biodiversity and … Continue reading Designing marine reserve networks with stakeholders

Marine reserve design infographic in Bahasa Indonesia

Last week I wrote about our new paper in Journal of Applied Ecology, Using reef fish movement to inform marine reserve design. My co-authors and I really excited to see the approach we demonstrate in the paper applied elsewhere, so I was thrilled to be contacted by Jensi Sartin of Reef Check Foundation Indonesia (and JCU alumnus) who asked … Continue reading Marine reserve design infographic in Bahasa Indonesia