Implementation strategies for systematic conservation planning

The extent to which systematic conservation plans have effectively influenced management remains elusive, particularly regarding our understanding of the factors contributing to successful implementation. Several scholars have argued there is an important gap between planning and doing, sometimes even referring to it as the implementation crisis in conservation planning. Irrespective of the nature and size … Continue reading Implementation strategies for systematic conservation planning

Large-scale misrepresentations of conservation progress in the South Pacific

Aichi target 11 of the Convention on Biological Diversity calls for nations to protect 10% of their marine environment by 2020. However national progress towards to global conservation targets can only be assessed when the data employed are sound. This note recently published in the journal Marine Policy highlights the large-scale misrepresentation, by up to … Continue reading Large-scale misrepresentations of conservation progress in the South Pacific

Two comments in Science questioning the value of large marine parks

Members of the Conservation Planning Group were authors on two letters published today in the journal Science. Jessica Cramp comments on the effectiveness of a large shark reserve in Micronesia. The establishment of the reserve was received with fanfare from the conservation community and, if left in place as initially intended, would have increased protection for … Continue reading Two comments in Science questioning the value of large marine parks

Perceptions of Cyclone Preparedness: Assessing the Role of Individual Adaptive Capacity and Social Capital in the Wet Tropics, Australia

Given projections of future climate-related disasters, understanding the conditions that facilitate disaster preparedness is critical to achieving sustainable development. In a new paper led by Anushka Sandanam and co-authored by myself and Amy Diedrich, we examined whether people’s perceived preparedness for a future cyclone relates to their: (1) perceived individual adaptive capacity (in terms of flexibility … Continue reading Perceptions of Cyclone Preparedness: Assessing the Role of Individual Adaptive Capacity and Social Capital in the Wet Tropics, Australia

Inadequate protection of the Great Barrier Reef, and where to from here?

The Great Barrier Reef, in northern Queensland, is a national and international icon, its significance recognised by World Heritage listing. The Reef has its own dedicated agency to oversee management and avoid adverse impacts from development. The sources of these impacts are diverse, ranging from coastal development and shipping, fishing, catchment land uses, and global warming. The … Continue reading Inadequate protection of the Great Barrier Reef, and where to from here?

Assessing bycatch threats to mobile marine species and evaluating the effectiveness of marine protected areas

Fisheries bycatch can result in significant biomass removal of protected and vulnerable species, leading to population decline and increased extinction risk. A principal role of marine protected areas (MPAs) is to prevent biodiversity loss, so it is important to test the ability of MPAs to mitigate bycatch. In a new paper authored by Heather Welch … Continue reading Assessing bycatch threats to mobile marine species and evaluating the effectiveness of marine protected areas

Cumulative human impacts on Brazilian coral reefs

Rafael Magris is lead author on a new study just out in the journal Diversity reporting on a risk assessment of the coral reefs in Brazil. The study mapped out the geographic patterns of exposure of reefs to a range of stressors: fishing, land-based pollution, mining, shipping movements, coastal development, aquaculture, and global warming. By accounting … Continue reading Cumulative human impacts on Brazilian coral reefs

Governance failure limits water quality improvement for the Great Barrier Reef

Management of the Great Barrier Reef's catchments is vital to improving water quality of the Reef. Investments in management of these cathments in recent decades total hundreds of millions of dollars, but measurable improvements have been slight. One reason is that the complex governance of the Reef and its catchments has failed in a number of ways. … Continue reading Governance failure limits water quality improvement for the Great Barrier Reef

Investigating Stakeholder Perceptions of Fish Decline: Making Sense of Multiple Mental Models

Stakeholders hold different types of knowledge pertaining to resource decline, formed from different personal experiences and education. Sharing of knowledge between stakeholders is vital to effectively co-manage a resource because it can improve the ability to generate solutions that meet the needs of all stakeholders. Jeremy Horowitz is the lead author of a new paper … Continue reading Investigating Stakeholder Perceptions of Fish Decline: Making Sense of Multiple Mental Models