New Paper: Using reef fish movement to inform marine reserve design

In this post Rebecca Weeks discusses her recent paper ‘Using reef fish movement to inform marine reserve design‘. Reproduced from the Journal of Applied Ecology blog. Photo above: Luiz Rocha The majority of marine protected areas in Pohnpei (Federated States of Micronesia) are too small to protect the species that people care about most. But when livelihoods depend … Continue reading New Paper: Using reef fish movement to inform marine reserve design

15 ways to weaken (or strengthen) a protected-area system

At the meeting of the Society for Conservation Biology (Oceania) in Brisbane, July 2016, Bob Pressey led a symposium on recent weakening of the Australia protected-area system. Examples of weakening include legal changes to boundaries or allowed uses, but there are many other examples, typically under the public's radar, of weakening without legal changes. The … Continue reading 15 ways to weaken (or strengthen) a protected-area system

The Conservation Planning Group at SCBO2016

Several members and of the Conservation Planning Group will be in Brisbane this week for the Society for Conservation Biology Oceania Congress. Our scheduled presentations are below. Hope to see you there! Name Presentation Session Day Time Room Jessica Blythe Building Governance Capacity Through Social Networks Social Network Analysis for Conservation: Challenges and Opportunities Wed 6th July 11:40 … Continue reading The Conservation Planning Group at SCBO2016

Does tourism really suffer at sites listed as World Heritage In Danger?

A recent article in The Conversation explores the possible impact for tourism on the Great Barrier Reef given the potential for listing of the Reef as World Heritage in Danger. Jon Day (PhD candidate in the ARC Centre for Coral Reef Studies) outlines the impacts for tourism at three other famous World Heritage destinations - … Continue reading Does tourism really suffer at sites listed as World Heritage In Danger?

The Conservation Planning Group at ICRS 2016

Several members and recent alumni of the Conservation Planning Group will soon be off to Hawaii for the 13th International Coral Reef Symposium. Our scheduled presentations are below. Hope to see you there! Name Presentation Session Day Time Room Bob Pressey PLANNING AND MANAGING MARINE PROTECTED AREAS: FROM BELIEF SYSTEMS TO EVIDENCE 69 Evaluating the … Continue reading The Conservation Planning Group at ICRS 2016

New paper: Planning for both feature representation and demographic persistence

A new paper in PLoS ONE by Michael Bode and colleagues from James Cook University demonstrates how conservation planning can be done simultaneously for both biodiversity pattern and process. The paper addresses two key challenges to designing marine reserve networks: 1. constructing a method that efficiently incorporates persistence as well as complementary feature representation; and 2. … Continue reading New paper: Planning for both feature representation and demographic persistence

JCU-UFG collaboration (Universidade Federal de Goiás)

In May 2016, Bob Pressey is spending four weeks working at the Universidade Federal de Goiás (UFG) in Goiânia, Brazil. Bob is a visiting professor at UFG, and working principally with Rafael Loyola and his research students. In the accompanying photo, Rafael is the cool-looking dude at the back, toward the left, checked shirt, not tucked … Continue reading JCU-UFG collaboration (Universidade Federal de Goiás)

Congratulate our three new conservation planning doctors!

The Conservation Planning Group is proud to announce the recent graduation of three of its members. Georgina, Rafael and Melanie received their PhD degrees from James Cook University in March 2016. All three were primarily supervised by Prof. Bob Pressey and undertook their research at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. Dr. … Continue reading Congratulate our three new conservation planning doctors!

Conversation piece: Great Barrier Reef bleaching stats are bad enough without media misreporting

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Jon C. Day, PhD candidate, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University The widespread bleaching event occurring across the Great Barrier Reef is unprecedented in scale and severity. It has rightly gained global media attention. Sadly, however, some of … Continue reading Conversation piece: Great Barrier Reef bleaching stats are bad enough without media misreporting