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New paper: Predicted impact of community-based marine reserve design is comparable to a systematic approach

      When planning a marine reserve, the efficacy of different approaches should be assessed by their potential impact. This research (Smallhorn-West et al. 2018) predicted the impact, or recovery of target species biomass, for different marine reserve configurations in the Vava'u island group in the Kingdom of Tonga. Specifically, we asked whether the … Continue reading New paper: Predicted impact of community-based marine reserve design is comparable to a systematic approach

Stakeholders get together to think about the future of the Fitzroy River catchment, Kimberley, Western Australia

NESP Northern Australia Environmental Resources Hub’s project on multiple objective planning in northern Australia is guiding participatory scenario planning to construct and assess the outcomes of alternative development scenarios in the Fitzroy catchment, WA. The project’s planning team will meet three times to discuss possible development pathways for the Fitzroy catchment and their consequences. On July … Continue reading Stakeholders get together to think about the future of the Fitzroy River catchment, Kimberley, Western Australia

New paper: a systematic review of the socioeconomic factors that influence how marine protected areas impact on ecosystems and livelihoods

Marine protected areas (MPAs) are not always placed where they can maximise positive impacts on conservation and livelihoods. Whilst clear MPA guidelines are available that focus on biophysical criteria, less attention has been given to incorporating socioeconomic dimensions into the MPA planning process. A new paper, led by Me’ira Mizrahi and published in Society and … Continue reading New paper: a systematic review of the socioeconomic factors that influence how marine protected areas impact on ecosystems and livelihoods

The Conservation Planning Group is heading to New Zealand!

The Society for Conservation Biology Oceania is hosting its 5th Oceania Congress for Conservation Biology in Wellington, New Zealand. The conference, which takes place from July 3-5 2018, is an opportunity for scientists, managers, students, and other conservation professionals to meet, discuss, and share new findings and opportunities to address conservation challenges. Four members of … Continue reading The Conservation Planning Group is heading to New Zealand!

New paper: Who trusts whom in the Great Barrier Reef? Exploring trust and communication in natural resource management

Trust is an important element of social capital that is increasingly recognized as integral to effective natural resource management, yet the concept remains relatively unexplored in the environmental social sciences. In a new paper led by Tracy MacKeracher and co-authored by myself, Amy Diedrich and Nadine Marshall, we examined trust in the context of management of … Continue reading New paper: Who trusts whom in the Great Barrier Reef? Exploring trust and communication in natural resource management

The Conservation Planning Group go to IMCC5!

This week, members of The Conservation Planning Group will be travelling to the wonderful city of Kuching for the 5th International Marine Conservation Congress. The overall theme for this year's congress is set to be an exciting one: Making Marine Science Matter to stakeholders, policy makers, and practitioners for effective marine conservation. You can find details of … Continue reading The Conservation Planning Group go to IMCC5!

Implementation strategies for systematic conservation planning

The extent to which systematic conservation plans have effectively influenced management remains elusive, particularly regarding our understanding of the factors contributing to successful implementation. Several scholars have argued there is an important gap between planning and doing, sometimes even referring to it as the implementation crisis in conservation planning. Irrespective of the nature and size … Continue reading Implementation strategies for systematic conservation planning

Large-scale misrepresentations of conservation progress in the South Pacific

Aichi target 11 of the Convention on Biological Diversity calls for nations to protect 10% of their marine environment by 2020. However national progress towards to global conservation targets can only be assessed when the data employed are sound. This note recently published in the journal Marine Policy highlights the large-scale misrepresentation, by up to … Continue reading Large-scale misrepresentations of conservation progress in the South Pacific

Two comments in Science questioning the value of large marine parks

Members of the Conservation Planning Group were authors on two letters published today in the journal Science. Jessica Cramp comments on the effectiveness of a large shark reserve in Micronesia. The establishment of the reserve was received with fanfare from the conservation community and, if left in place as initially intended, would have increased protection for … Continue reading Two comments in Science questioning the value of large marine parks